Step 8.2 Describe the character's conflict

Stories need conflict.244 You can classify most types of conflict used in stories.245 How you classify a conflict affects the way the reader wants the conflict resolved.246 So whether a legal argument prevails can depend on how you classify the conflict. To classify the conflict, relate the lawsuit to your character's goals and needs. For example, see if you can classify the conflict in one of the following categories.

brainstorm BRAINSTORM

Describe how your client is having a conflict with …

  • a powerful institution (for example, an individual fighting government, the Church, big business; in other words, the 'little guy' versus the 'big guy')
  • another person (for example, a custody dispute)
  • fate (a fight against an inevitable or uncontrollable problem or bad luck)
  • society (for example, an individual fighting society's prejudices)
  • themselves (for example, a struggle to overcome a drug addiction)

Table 64: Describe your client's conflict

244 Ruth Anne Robbins and BJ Foley, 'Fiction 101: A Primer for Lawyers on How to Use Fiction Writing Techniques to Write Persuasive Facts Sections' (2001) 32(2) Rutgers Law Journal 459, 469.

245 Ruth Anne Robbins and BJ Foley, 'Fiction 101: A Primer for Lawyers on How to Use Fiction Writing Techniques to Write Persuasive Facts Sections' (2001) 32(2) Rutgers Law Journal 459, 469.

246 Ruth Anne Robbins and BJ Foley, 'Fiction 101: A Primer for Lawyers on How to Use Fiction Writing Techniques to Write Persuasive Facts Sections' (2001) 32(2) Rutgers Law Journal 459, 469.

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