Step 1.2.3 Explain the facts

When you can explain the facts in your own words, from memory, and with no hesitation,111 you can have confidence that you know the facts — at least for now. You should preferably explain the facts to someone who knows nothing about the case and ask them what they think. This will show how well you know and can state the facts.112 You may explain the facts to a lawyer or a non-lawyer.113 The more people you can practice on, the better.114 If you have no-one to explain the facts to, explain the facts verbally to yourself.

111 Edward D Re and Joseph R Re, Brief Writing and Oral Argument (9th ed, 2005) 79 (referring to the appeal record).

112 Harold R Medina, 'The Oral Argument on Appeal' in George Rossman (ed), Advocacy and the King's English (1960) 537, 539–540. See also Mario Pittoni, Brief Writing and Argumentation (3rd ed, 1967) 29.

113 Harold R Medina, 'The Oral Argument on Appeal' in George Rossman (ed), Advocacy and the King's English (1960) 537, 539–40.

114 Harold R Medina, 'The Oral Argument on Appeal' in George Rossman (ed), Advocacy and the King's English (1960) 537, 539–40.

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