2. The Inspector

InspectorThe Artist's nemesis, 'The Inspector', uses the most contractionary mindset of the Toolkit's characters. He has:

'a kind of critical energy … He's been educated and knows a sentence fragment when he sees one. He peers over your shoulder and says, "That's trash!".'77

You must keep The Inspector away from the other characters, especially The Artist:

'Since judgment hinders imagination, separate the creative act from the critical one; separate the process of thinking up possible decisions from the process of selecting among them. Invent first, decide later.'78

The trick lies in turning off that 'ruthless scepticism, the fear that an idea is foolish, the pragmatic sense of the realistic',79 while thinking up solutions and 'then to turn them back on once you have assembled a full range of solutions and are ready to start evaluating them'.80

The Inspector works mainly on Step 10 (Review) but may also play a role in sorting relevant facts from irrelevant facts (Step 2), evaluating sources (Step 5), and evaluating arguments (Step 9). In this Toolkit, a check box represents The Inspector's mindset.

77 Betty S Flowers, 'Madman, Architect, Carpenter, Judge: Roles and the Writing Process' (1979) 44 Proceedings of the Conference of College Teachers in English 7.

78 Thomas Michael McDonnell, 'Playing Beyond the Rules: A Realist and Rhetoric Approach to Researching the Law and Solving Legal Problems' (1998) 67 UMKC Law Review 285, 309. See also Richard K Neumann, Legal Reasoning and Legal Writing: Structure, Style, and Strategy(5th ed, 2005) 304 ('[B]ecause solution-generation and solution-evaluation depend on contrary qualities, you must be careful not to let that critical skepticism—of which we teach so much—overwhelm your ability to imagine the widest range of possibilities').

79 Richard K Neumann, Legal Reasoning and Legal Writing: Structure, Style, and Strategy(5th ed, 2005) 304.

80 Richard K Neumann, Legal Reasoning and Legal Writing: Structure, Style, and Strategy(5th ed, 2005) 304. See also Tom Goldstein and Jethro K Lieberman, The Lawyer's Guide to Writing Well (2002) 44 (quoting Friedrich von Schiller).

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